Led Zeppelin – Physical Graffiti (1975)

Album Review

Led Zeppelin returned from a nearly two-year hiatus in 1975 with Physical Graffiti, a sprawling, ambitious double album. Zeppelin treat many of the songs on Physical Graffiti as forays into individual styles, only occasionally synthesizing sounds, notably on the tense, Eastern-influenced “Kashmir.” With John Paul Jones’ galloping keyboard, “Trampled Underfoot” ranks as their funkiest metallic grind, while “Houses of the Holy” is as effervescent as pre-Beatles pop and “Down by the Seaside” is the closest they’ve come to country. Even the heavier blues — the 11-minute “In My Time of Dying,” the tightly wound “Custard Pie,” and the monstrous epic “The Rover” — are subtly shaded, even if they’re thunderously loud. Most of these heavy rockers are isolated on the first album, with the second half of. Read more on allmusic.com

Tracks

Disc 1

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Disc 2

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